Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)

The mad scientist/researcher is coming out again in me....this personality overtakes and consumes my thoughts for hours or even days at a time. This is just my own personal rant.....so beware!

I noticed in my last set of bloodwork that I have an elevated EBV titer of 7.6. I didn't have a clue to what this was....so I brought out my husbands old medical books. Turns out this is the virus that causes Mononucleosis. Did I have Mono or did I have it in past??? I did more research and found out that people with Sjogrens Syndrome tend to have an elvated EBV titer. Interesting....

Then I stumbled across a few studies that were trying to come to the conclusion that EBV may cause Sjogrens Syndrome and it does say that there is evidence indirectly.

The virus infects the immune B cells and multiplies in the salivary glands and surface tissues of the nasal and throat passages. After the initial infection, the virus remains dormant in the host's body, that is, exists without being infective. EBV can stimulate the production of autoantibodies, which are abnormal immune proteins directed against the body's own tissues and cells. Various lines of evidence suggest that EBV may be involved in the development of two autoimmune disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and Sjogren's syndrome.

Hmmmm....I am just wondering.

Anyone have anything to add to this? I wonder if there are any current studies going on about EBV and Sjogrens or other autoimmune disorders.....

3 comments:

Kelly said...

You so better not give me Mono! ;)

Pam said...

Vicky, ok so here's what I picked up on that very topic going through the transplant procedure. Mono, EBV, and some other similar viruses are present in everyone's body to a certain degree. After a transplant those viruses or the strain those virus originate from are reactivated and that's why a medicine Valcyte is prescribed for about 3 months after transplant. Only 1% of the population has never been exposed to these viruses and so one of the blood tests they do on the donor and receipent of a transplant is check for the antibodies. I was unusual in the fact I had never been exposed but my donor had so I had to be on Valcyte for 6 months instead of 3 months. Another virus from that strain is referred to as the BK virus and I don't know what that stands for. Valcyte is an anti=virual medicine and out of all my meds was the most expensive. Over 460.00 for a 30 day supply and that was after insurance with a very good presription plan. Another drug they put me on was Nexium because of all the medication having the potential to irritate the stomach. Unfortunately the insurance only will cover it for about 3 months after a transplant. The option is Prilosec OTC after that.

Vicky said...

Thanks Pam....Interesting! They told me about Valcyte too and said I would probably be on it for 6 months after transplant. Thank Goodness my insurance co-pay is only $25.00 a month for it. At least that is what I have been told by my co-worker who is a pharmacist.

Hope you had a great Thanksgiving!